Best options for consolidating student loans

It is quite common for people with student loans to deal with 10-12 lending institutions, which means 10-12 payments and 10-12 due dates each month.

When you consolidate student loans – either federal or private – it’s one payment to one lender, once-a-month. Loan consolidation for student loans was created to make it easier for millions of borrowers to pay off their debt.

To successfully navigate this often confusing process, you need to understand the pros and cons of refinancing, what to expect from the process, and what programs are offered by top lenders in the industry. Federal student loans come in two types: Direct Subsidized Loans or Direct Unsubsidized Loans.

First, what does consolidating student loans really mean?

If the requirements above sound good, we think that you are a great applicant for student loan refinancing and consolidation.

Each lender has its own specific underwriting criteria, so you may have a higher chance of approval at certain lenders.

When even the basic term "consolidation" means different things for different lenders, the process can understandably seem daunting.

But if you're looking to save thousands on student loan interest payments -- as well as time and headaches from managing multiple monthly payments -- then understanding the consolidation process is critical.

If you're consolidating with the federal government, consolidating your loans means combining your multiple federal student loans into one new federal loan, called a Direct Consolidation Loan.

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