Dating capodimonte marks

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Robert Allen handpainted wares were never produced in large quantities and many were never repeated.

The dates given below give a close approximation of when the designs were produced.

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Museum di Amsterdam e ritrovati dalla Guardia di Finanza in un covo della camorra, a settembre dello scorso anno.

Factors other than the Doulton mark can help in more accurate dating, particularly pattern names and numbers and date codes or artists monograms. Several other Doulton marks occur in the very early stages and incorporate pattern names such as ROUEN and KEW, with some remaining in use for up to twenty years.

Between 18, Henry and James Doulton acquired a major interest in the Pinder Bourne factory in Nile Street, Burlsem and changed the name to Doulton & Company, Burlsem. The following tables contain a selection of the most commonly used BURSLEM and LAMBETH ware marks.

The Crown and Neapolitan N, was originally painted or impressed on porcelain and ceramics produced at the Royal Factory in Naples from 1759 to 1780 and was synonymous with the finest quality Neapolitan porcelain and ceramics from that period onwards.

However, the logo, in the present day, is not necessarily a guarantee of porcelain or ceramic quality.

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And; how production of Capodimonte Porcelain Figurines and floral displays dates back to the early eighteenth century and to the Kingdom of Naples.

Robert Allen and artists in his studio were often allocated RA-numbers for their hand-painted wares designed and decorated by them.

The RA numbers are mostly hand-written and accompany the standard Doulton marks.

His desire was to create a porcelain manufactory of a quality comparable with the electors factory in Saxony, and whose methods and ingredients were only known by the chemist Bottger Charles initially allocated a small building in the Royal Palace to be dedicated to porcelain production under the direction of Giovanni Caselli and the chemist Livio Ottavio Schepers, who had originally worked at the Neapolitan Mint.

In spite of many efforts, including underhand methods, the formula remained a mystery and after many investigations Charles finally concluded that the conditions in his little building were not suitable for porcelain production, there being insufficient space for the ovens and driers.

The Doulton marks are many and varied but most follow the same theme.

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